My bass family; I’m in college right now, and I couldn’t bring any of them with me because of the size constraints of my room. I miss them like crazy.
(From L to R)
Gretsch G5442BDC: Purchased as a high school graduation present to myself…it’s my baby. My first short scale, and my first hollowbody electric, and it absolutely slays. A lot of good tones come out of this thing, and it’s pretty nice to look at too. I’m really digging the short scale, so I’m thinking I might buy short scale basses exclusively now.
Ibanez SR600: My first “nice” bass as well as my first active bass. Bought it a little more than a year ago on a whim, and it’s awesome. It’s the most comfortable bass I own (the necks on these Soundgear models are super thin with a satin finish), and I’m able to adjust the sound really nicely with the 3 Band EQ.
Fender Kingman: I bought this bass when I was in my “folk rocker” stage. It’s a pretty cool instrument, but not useable in a lot of band situations. Really great for practicing and noodling around.

My bass family; I’m in college right now, and I couldn’t bring any of them with me because of the size constraints of my room. I miss them like crazy.

(From L to R)

Gretsch G5442BDC: Purchased as a high school graduation present to myself…it’s my baby. My first short scale, and my first hollowbody electric, and it absolutely slays. A lot of good tones come out of this thing, and it’s pretty nice to look at too. I’m really digging the short scale, so I’m thinking I might buy short scale basses exclusively now.

Ibanez SR600: My first “nice” bass as well as my first active bass. Bought it a little more than a year ago on a whim, and it’s awesome. It’s the most comfortable bass I own (the necks on these Soundgear models are super thin with a satin finish), and I’m able to adjust the sound really nicely with the 3 Band EQ.

Fender Kingman: I bought this bass when I was in my “folk rocker” stage. It’s a pretty cool instrument, but not useable in a lot of band situations. Really great for practicing and noodling around.

Anonymous asked:

How do you improvise a bass line?

For me : practice. The more practice you can get the better and eventually you’ll begin to notice that certain notes go well with certain chord tones.

One thing to watch out for is that you don’t get stuck in a rut doing similar sounding bass lines over and over again. To stop this I will occasionally pick a few songs I enjoy and learn them to try and pick up new ideas.

I would recommend checking out a website called WikiLoops. Basically people post their music and other people from around the work jam along to it. Great for practicing loads of different genres and some amazing musicians on there.

- Cameron.

Anonymous asked:

@Cameron. wait are @'s cool? fuck it, i don't care. anyways, I was wondering if you had any advice on like becoming a session bassist?

Sorry for the slow reply. I don’t come on Tumblr very often and been busy over the last few weeks!

Back to the question.

Advice I would give would go for practically everything in music.

Contacts - the more people you know in the music industry the better. The majority of sessioning I have done has been for people who I have known for a while. When you have your name out there as a reliable and competent bassist, work will come easier.

Theory - learning music theory -although not necessarily required- is a huge advantage, especially when it comes to higher demanding work where sheet music may be given and you may be expected to use that without any rehearsing.

Gear/transportation - it is important to have suitable gear and transport. No use turning up to a 500+ venue with a 20watt practice amp.

Not being a dick - sounds somewhat condescending but the better you are to get along with the more likely people are to keep you in mind for future jobs.

Versatility - The more genres and styles of music you can play the better as it opens up different types of gigs for you.

- Cameron.

Anonymous asked:

hello, my dad recently found his old bass in my grandads loft and its about 30 years old, so i need to change the strings, i literally know nothing about bass guitars or where to start so i need some advice on strings (i measured that the nut to the bridge is 26.5 inches) :)

Is it a short scale bass? You may have to find some special short scale strings. Most companies make short scale strings but you will need to make sure you get the right scale length.

Normal basses are 34” or 35”. 26.5” is really short for a bass! A usual short scale is 33”!

-CJ

Anonymous asked:

why are you hating on that girl? she made it clear she didn't really build it. so what's the problem? =/ (I don't mean to be agressive, just wanna understand ^^)

I’m not? I just reblogged it? Plus she’s an idiot? She feeds totally the wrong information to her followers. She knows fuck all. I always ALWAYS check on my shit before I let it out to you guys so you get the right information. It’s little things like that, that make a difference! -CJ

bassistsunited

monochrome-goodness asked:

Do you think that you have to use a pick to be considered a 'real' bassist

bassistsunited answered:

Hell no! I use a pick myself, but I also use my fingers, to be honest in my personal opinion it depends on the particular sound you want for a specific song for example, something that originally was recorded on a double bass, I would use my fingers. But if I’m playing Metallica and thrashing the shit out of my instrument, pick.

In my opinion, rock and metal ect is meant for the use of a pick. I mean, Lemmy and Jason Newsted made me feel ok for using picks. They are two who inspired me a hell of a lot, but let’s not go into that, the list of my inspirations on the bass is honestly never ending.

Frankly this debate has been going on for decades and I think it’s fucking stupid. Any narrow minded, arrogant asshole who says “real bassists only play with their fingers” needs to grow up and accept the fact everyone has their comfort zone. Some people like to explore new techniques, others just use what works for them, live and let live.

My responses however to these very narrow minded sorts of comments come out like this:

"No, Real bassists know how to use each technique effectively, and pull a different arrow out of their quiver for each situation, whether it be using finger technique, double thumbing, tapping, thumb and index, slapping, "fieldy slapping" (which in my opinion is a whole other level of strange technique, but it fucking works for him!), picking, muting or playing the fucking thing with your penis, it’s whatever works for YOU.

People shouldn’t be pressured into thinking there’s a right and wrong in terms of what works for them, but don’t get this statement confused with technique, there’s right and wrong there.

Music is about emotion, the more you don’t think and just play, the more the language will flow and use you as a conduit. It’s just how the music chooses to flow through you, we get a choice on.

Real bassists, are respectful friendly people that live and let live, don’t develop ego’s and stay out of the spotlight until an opportunity occurs, that’s when people realise it’s not all about thrashing guitar solos and great singing.

We hold the low end, we bring the thunder and we are the only ones who can make the ground beneath our feet shake and make the crowds jump.

I’m proud to be a bassist, I’m proud to run this blog and I’m proud to say, I use a pick when I deem it right and use it EFFECTIVELY!

-CJ
bassistsunited

bleedmetalordie asked:

Sorry to keep asking things but is it ok to use a pick on bass, I dunno I just like the sound better

bassistsunited answered:

Is it ok?! IS IT OK?! SOME OF THE BEST BASS PLAYERS OUT THERE USE PICKS! Hang on I had an epic answer to this a while back let me just find it…

"I use a pick myself, but I also use my fingers, to be honest in my personal opinion it depends on the particular sound you want for a specific song for example, something that originally was recorded on a double bass, I would use my fingers. But if I’m playing Metallica and thrashing the shit out of my instrument, pick.

In my opinion, rock and metal etc is meant for the use of a pick. I mean, Lemmy and Jason Newsted made me feel ok for using picks. They are two who inspired me a hell of a lot, but let’s not go into that, the list of my inspirations on the bass is honestly never ending.

Frankly this debate has been going on for decades and I think it’s fucking stupid. Any narrow minded, arrogant asshole who says “real bassists only play with their fingers” needs to grow up and accept the fact everyone has their comfort zone. Some people like to explore new techniques, others just use what works for them, live and let live.

My responses however to these very narrow minded sorts of comments come out like this:

"No, Real bassists know how to use each technique effectively, and pull a different arrow out of their quiver for each situation, whether it be using finger technique, double thumbing, tapping, thumb and index, slapping, “fieldy slapping” (which in my opinion is a whole other level of strange technique, but it fucking works for him!), picking, muting or playing the fucking thing with your penis, it’s whatever works for YOU.

People shouldn’t be pressured into thinking there’s a right and wrong in terms of what works for them, but don’t get this statement confused with technique, there’s right and wrong there.

Music is about emotion, the more you don’t think and just play, the more the language will flow and use you as a conduit. It’s just how the music chooses to flow through you, we get a choice on. Real bassists, are respectful friendly people that live and let live, don’t develop ego’s and stay out of the spotlight until an opportunity occurs, that’s when people realise it’s not all about thrashing guitar solos and great singing.

We hold the low end, we bring the thunder and we are the only ones who can make the ground beneath our feet shake and make the crowds jump. I’m proud to be a bassist, I’m proud to run this blog and I’m proud to say, I use a pick when I deem it right and use it EFFECTIVELY!”

So basically yes it is ok to use a pick. You do what you find comfortable. Does that kinda answer your question?

bassistsunited

ohmygoshluke asked:

You literally have a tumblr for bass guitars i wouldn't be talking

bassistsunited answered:

I’m sorry what? You literally have a tumblr for Harry styles for fucks sake. I have over 1000 followers that you might want to think twice before pissing them off.

I’m sure you guys hate Harry Styles as much as me. I also don’t understand why this idiot behind the blog (most likely a very sad, immature 14 year old who thinks Harry Styles has talent) has now designated a problem with our bass guitar blog?

Anonymous asked:

The fucking negativity on this blog is really unattractive. If you're going to run a blog about bassists and their instruments, keep the drama with that other blog off here. It's unsightly to see a "professional" going out of their way to call out another blog.

I’ll put whatever I like on my blog and on this one thank you :)
-CJ

fuckyeahbassguitars

Anonymous asked:

That's bullshit. We know for a fact when you say you did woodwork on that bass you mean all you did was screw the neck on. It's obviously a kit/project cheap p-bass off eBay. Don't make out you made it from scratch when you haven't. You painted it, great. But it's a long way off being a professional job, and your a long way off being a professional luthier and having the know how of building quality instruments using woodworking skills. So don't lie and try and make out your something you're not

fuckyeahbassguitars answered:

Yes it’s cheap basswood. Yes it’s also cheap rosewood. Yes I am incapable of designing and castiron my own parts so of course they are ordered online.
You did read the part that stated that I got help from a professional right?
I know that I am far from a luthier. Hell I’m still saving up to go to go to luthier school. I’m new to the industry and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. We all got to start off somewhere.

Hope you have a wonderful day! :)